IS Sourcing

IS Sourcing

Information Systems (IS) Sourcing is a broad umbrella term that refers to the contracting or delegating of IS- or IT-related work (e.g., an ongoing service or one-off project) to an internal or external entity (a supplier). It encompasses various sourcing models that are typically based on the distinction between ownership (in-house or third party) and location (domestic, nearshore or offshore), as well as online sourcing models. The significance of this topic for the IS discipline is evident in the number of publications that have addressed different aspects of IS sourcing since 1998 when the first two MISQ articles on this topic were published.

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Health Information Technology

Health Information Technology

Health information technology (health IT) research is conducted at an intriguing intersection between societies, organizations, and consumers. Health IT is defined as “a broad concept that encompasses an array of technologies to store, share, and analyze health information.”  The rapid increase in adoption and use of health IT since the mid-2000s has afforded considerable research opportunities to evaluate and test existing theories (e.g., Paul and McDaniel Jr 2004) as well as to create and refine new ones (e.g., Gao et al. 2015).

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Knowledge Management

Knowledge Management

The notions of knowledge and its management have been at the core of the information systems (IS) field almost since its inception. Knowledge has been viewed in several ways in the prior literature, including as a state of mind, an object, a process, access to information, and a capability. A commonly-used definition characterizes knowledge as a justified belief that increases an entity's capacity for effective action (Alavi and Leidner 2001, p. 109). Relatedly, knowledge management (KM) has been defined as a systemic process to acquire, organize, and communicate individual knowledge so that others may make use of it (Beck et al. 2014). Knowledge-management systems (KMSs) support these processes for creating, exchanging, and storing knowledge (Beck et al. 2014), and have been viewed as being either repository-based or network-based (Kankanhalli et al. 2005).

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IS Use

IS Use

Information systems (IS) use is among the most central constructs in the IS discipline (Straub and del Guidice 2012).  It is reported to be the most widely-studied construct in our field (Cordoba et al. 2012), and it is certainly one of the most consequential, for the nature, modalities and extents of information systems use significantly impact outcomes at individual, group, organization, network, society, and country levels.

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Information Privacy

Information Privacy

This curation highlights the 22 articles with a primary focus on information privacy that have been published in MIS Quarterly (see Table 1). Almost all of the definitions of information privacy in these articles have relied on the concept of a data subject’s control of information about himself or herself, and we embrace such a definition here: “the ability of the individual to personally control information about one’s self” (Awad and Krishnan 2006; Smith et al 1996). Note that Bélanger and Crossler (2011) offered definitions of information privacy concerns (distinct from, but obviously related to, definitions of information privacy itself) at the group, organizational, and societal levels.

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Trust

Trust

Trust is the enabler of social interaction. Although the origins of research on trust traditionally lie outside the Information Systems (IS) domain, the importance of trust for IS research rapidly grew in the late 1990s, and it is still growing with the increasing ubiquity and advancement of technology in organizations, virtual teams, online markets, and user-technology interactions.

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Securing Digital Assets

Securing Digital Assets

The security of digital assets has grown from being the concern of a few technologists to an issue that impacts society at large in virtually every sector, including government, business, and healthcare. This general trend is mirrored in the pages of MIS Quarterly. Although the importance of securing digital assets was recognized as early as the journal’s second year of publication (Halloran et al. 1978), research on security was relatively sparse until the last decade which has seen a marked increase of published articles on the topic.

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